Finding Happiness In A Small And Cluttered Workshop

Sometimes my wife refers to my workshop as “Doug’s playroom.” She’s right.

Some luthiers have workshops that look like laboratories. Others have workshops that make mine look like a laboratory. I walk the middle path.

Here are some honest and candid pictures of one of my favorite places to be. I love and enjoy my work. Like any craftsperson there are times the work is challenging and there are the “oops!” moments but in the long run that is part of the joy as well.

If you are reading this post on Facebook you won’t see all the pretty pictures so click on the link, visit my website, and gawk in amazement or horror! 🙂

A place for everything and everything is someplace.

Let there be light. And planes.

 

More dulcimer maker stuff.

Does this tool look boring?

There is a place for everything and everything is some place!

 

What’s On The Bench 12/18/2016

Sanding dulcimers. The fun never ends.Two dulcimers have been gone over with scrapers and files and now comes sanding. And sanding. And then some more sanding.

I enjoy working with scrapers and files. Sanding is messy and time consuming.

There was a time when most luthiers did not do much sanding. The finished instrument did not have a perfect, homogeneous surface. It looked like wood that was worked by hand with edge tools.

The tool marks and slight unevenness in finish and texture of a scraped and filed instrument is beautiful in my eyes. In our current industrial society many people think wood should look like a photograph of wood more than wood itself.

So I sand my dulcimers.

Still, there will be the occasional tool mark that I don’t sand out. I made this dulcimer. I made that tool mark.  And to me it is beautiful.

By “tool mark” I am referring to a subtle witness that a plane, chisel, scraper or file had been used to work the surface. By “tool mark” I don’t refer to marks left by the sawmill, the bandsaw, a dulcimer-making machine, etc.

For years I have thought of making a sandpaper-free model. I’m sure some people would like it. Or not. Maybe someday.

That’s dulcimer #157 on the bench. The old shaving brush is great for sweeping away dust from all the nooks and crannies.

Not in the photograph is the dust mask I wear while sanding and and air cleaner that sucks the dust out of the air.

You can see photographs of work in progress regularly by following me on Instagram.

 

Gluing Up A Dulcimer Peghead

Gluing up a dulcimer peghead.

I don’t really need to use clamps when gluing up a dulcimer peghead assembly but I feel better knowing the clamp is there. Hide glue added to a clean and well-fitting joint grabs and pulls the joint together as the hide glue sets up.

Clamping the parts together at an angle is tricky but in the photograph you can sort of see the peghead and the block beneath it are pressed up against an angled block of wood covered with wax paper. The peghead is clamped to the work board and there is wax paper on the work board as well.

This arrangement keeps parts from sliding when downward pressure is applied to the joint. They probably wouldn’t slide anyway since I’m using hide glue but I feel better knowing there is no chance of a rude surprise.

The wax paper prevents someone from getting a dulcimer with a work-board and an angled block of wood stuck to the peghead. That would make the dulcimer difficult to tune and it would be hard to find a case that fits.

After everything is clamped up I clean up the squeezed out glue with a rag and warm water. This is another benefit of hide glue; it cleans up with warm water and a rag.

You can see more photographs of dulcimers in progress and other stuff by following me on Instagram.